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Drawing the Line on Device Use in the Workplace

Drawing the Line on Device Use in the Workplace

Drawing the Line on Device Use in the Workplace

We love our devices. At this moment, the Internet is connected to over 20 billion devices. It’s a staggering number when compared to a global population around 7 billion. That’s nearly 3 devices for every person on earth. It goes without saying that all of these devices have an impact within the workplace. Where’s the line on device use, misuse? 

The world has been on a fast track to mobility for years. In 2020, mobility of consumerism exploded when the global health crisis forced reactive change. Our mobile devices became lifelines to everything from access to products, connectivity to services, and of course remote employment.

If you are an operations leader in your organization, you are likely feeling overwhelmed by new demands of technology and mobility of work. We offer these tips for prioritizing operational strategies that support employees needs around use and misuse of devices in the workplace:

  • Cell Phone Policy. Every employee handbook should provide basic policy on the presence and use of mobile devices in the workplace. Do you clearly direct that devices are out of sight and silent when and where customers are served? Do you clearly identify the distinctions and expectations for corporate-owned versus personal device use?
  • Work Device Policy. Beyond phone devices, your employee handbook should also provide policy for use of computer equipment in the workplace—which now may include business location and remote employee locations. Do you have procedures in place regarding installation, maintenance, use and even liability for corporate equipment in remote locations?  

You can support your employees’ adherence to device policy and procedures by creating consistent communication. Many organizations have dramatically reduced infractions of device use by committing to reminders released through broad company communications and/or channeled through managers for discussion during team meetings.

Set a course for success in 2021 by making technology as big of a priority for People Development as you do for Sales Development.

Center for Practical Management helps companies achieve organizational goals and behavioral change initiatives through tailored consulting services, leadership coaching, employee skills training and marketing services. Learn more at www.cf-pm.com. Center for Practical Management is a strategic business partner with Raddon, a Fiserv Company

Digital Experience Scorecard: A Product Conversation

Digital Experience Scorecard: A Product Conversation

Digital Experience Scorecard: A Product Conversation

You’ll discover how customizable scorecard-based feedback from customers can help you evaluate and improve services on digital channels. This 12-minute video conversation features client-specific insights from D.G Markwell of Max Credit Union in Montgomery, Alabama. 

Center for Practical Management helps companies achieve organizational goals and behavioral change initiatives through tailored consulting services, leadership coaching, employee skills training and marketing services. Learn more at www.cf-pm.com.

Rebuilding Customer Confidence Post-Pandemic

Rebuilding Customer Confidence Post-Pandemic

Rebuilding Customer Confidence Post-Pandemic

In the months since the health crisis shuttered the country and the world, business leaders faced unimaginable service challenges to keep their operations open when physical doors were forced closed. This called for clear thinking and operational creativity, especially for those businesses providing ‘essential’ services.

With service continuity well established, the hard work has only just begun. 
The customer mood is shifting. Customer confidence is low. Impatience and frustration are high. Customers are feeling the angst over service limitations and compromises, which they feel forced to accept. Will their patience expire? Is their loyalty at risk?

Meanwhile, your competitors are busy planning ways to meet their needs. Absolutely nothing could be more important right now than renewing your commitment to service quality and customer experience.

We offer business leaders the following three service-centric tactics to begin the process to re-prioritize commitments to customer experience:

  • The first is called Care Queries. Employees on the front lines of call centers, drive-up services and even limited in-branch locations should be trained to ask at least one service query, and to relay customer comments to management; i.e., ‘I hope you know we care about you! We’re asking customers if there is one thing, one need, one suggestion that would ensure we keep your trust in us through this time?’
  • The second is Electronic Scorecards. It goes without saying, service quality is going to need new definition, new priorities and new delivery mechanisms in 2021. Scorecards are a type of development insight that seeks to know whether you’re getting it right, getting it wrong or getting into trouble. Scoring your digital experience, uniquely from your branch experience, delivers channel-based discoveries.
  • The third is Virtual Focus Groups. If your customer insights efforts, to date, have never used focus groups, now is certainly the most video-conference friendly time to attract customer participation. Best of all, development of focus group research can be highly customized to your business needs and priorities. Virtual focus groups present endless possibilities for collecting customer insights.

Qualitative research has never been more relevant and valuable to business leaders. Center for Practical Management can help with custom development solutions aimed at helping leaders achieve alignment to new customer-experience priorities.

Call your Performance Partner today, or visit www.cf-pm.com/contact-us/

enter for Practical Management helps companies achieve organizational goals and behavioral change initiatives through tailored consulting services, leadership coaching, employee skills training and marketing services. Learn more at www.cf-pm.com

Finding Clarity After Business Disruption

Finding Clarity After Business Disruption

Finding Clarity After Business Disruption

Organizations face business disruptions on a regular basis. These disruptions commonly occur in the form of mergers, acquisitions, and organizational restructuring. Sometimes they occur as a result of a natural disaster, or even a global pandemic. The key to rebounding from a business disruption is having skilled leaders who can effectively shine a light on expectations.    

The first thing leaders discover during any business disruption is that their employees crave an insatiable thirst for information. They want to know that what they’ve been told is still current and accurate. They want you to know that not knowing is stressful. Above all, they want to know the performance expectations during and after the disruption. 

As managers, you have the responsibility of guiding team members through a disruption with positivity for growth and development of skills like resiliency and resourcefulness. Your priority role through the disruption is to return your team to peak productivity and performance as quickly as possible. 

Transitioning from a state of business disruption to a state of productivity and performance can be achieved with best practices for Clarifying Expectations:

One-on-One Touchbase conversations. Workforce surveys consistently say that employs value time with their manager as the most important factor in their performance and engagement. Consistency of these conversations must continue through a business disruption. Managers need to be ready and willing to field tough questions in times of increased worry, stress, anxiety.

Performance priorities and goals. Employees tend to rally during a disruption that is communicated effectively. However, if the duration of the disruption extends beyond anticipated duration, without clarification of priorities, employee engagement and performance will suffer. Short-term performance priorities and goals are recommended, updated regularly at team meetings. 

Team inclusion in solutions. Open dialogues about challenges and impacts of the business disruption become a tool for engaging employees in being a part of the organization’s success story. A team brainstorms should follow the productivity model of a) identifying opportunities, b) prioritizing solutions, c) creating an action plan. Including employees when preparing for the next business disruption is essential. Employees feel valued when they are utilized in crafting strategies and solutions to return to productivity and performance after a business disruption. 

Clearly, one of the most valuable outcomes of any business disruption is discovering talent on your team who demonstrates remarkable resiliency in times of stress. Future leaders emerge. A pleasant surprise for many organizations during business disruption; employees step up to encourage others and focus teams on service over stress.

We encourage managers to embrace the role of lighting the path that helps employees stay focused on growth and development. Something that only a business disruption uniquely creates.

Center for Practical Management helps companies achieve organizational goals and behavioral change initiatives through tailored consulting services, leadership coaching, employee skills training and marketing services. Learn more at www.cf-pm.com

Stretch More, Achieve More

Stretch More, Achieve More

Stretch More, Achieve More

The difference between wanting more and doing more to get more becomes the fuel toward any development goal. In business, the effort is known as turning up the heat on increased productivity and performance, and it comes down to types of motivation and skills of motivators.

One of the most important tasks for managers is learning what motivates individuals on their team. More experienced managers know that different types of motivation work for some individuals, but not others. In the same way, one motivation could be a successful influence once, but then an irrelevant motivator later.

Good managers dedicate time to conversations for motivation effectiveness. Great managers always have a motivation heat source ready to charge employee productivity and performance.

Review these industry-leading best practices for coaching and motivating employees:

  1. Praising their effort. Research studies show that employees rank praise from their manager as the number one motivator of their performance and engagement. Be sure you know if your employee prefers public or private praise.
  2. Dedicating your time. After praise and recognition, employees cite time with their manager as the next leading motivator. A weekly face to face conversation with employees is recommended.
  3. Developing their skills. Opportunities to showcase skills can be found in small project ownership or research assistance initiatives.
  4. Championing rewards. While money motivates a vast majority of employees, research shows that this particular motivation is short-lived. Managers should always balance financial rewards with other rewards.

In preparation of your next goal-setting discussion, consider staging the conversation around how better teaming can help fuel engagement and growth in your organization.

Center for Practical Management helps companies achieve organizational goals and behavioral change initiatives through tailored consulting services, leadership coaching, employee skills training and marketing services. Learn more at www.cf-pm.com