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The C-Suite & Newton

by | Mar 10, 2020 | News Release

Creating alignment between culture and strategy isn’t easy. Outside threats and unforeseen forces often disrupt organization effectiveness. When this happens, the C-Suite typically begins to vet consultants, hires new employees who have the desired skillset, and schedules employees for training. This course of action will result in visible changes, but generally, at disappointingly low levels.

Why does this happen?

We underestimate the pervasiveness or sheer mass of organizational culture; it’s only when we add up the components that we can start to understand its true size. It can be found in how we communicate with each other and customers, how we reward or penalize performance, how we measure success, view breaks or vacations, and spend our out-of-work time, etc.

How do Newton’s Laws of Motion apply?

1st Law (Objects in motion stays in motion until acted on by an outside force) The C-Suite identifies an outside force and pushes for changed strategy and new goals in response
2nd Law (Acceleration depends on mass of the object and the amount of force applied) Senior leaders implement strategy designed to limits friction and has the energy required to begin moving culture in a positive direction
3rd Law (Every action has an equal and opposite reaction) The old strategy may limit friction and build momentum; the new strategy could cause the culture to push back with equal force
What actions can the C-Suite take to ensure that their strategy is enough to create sustained change?

  • Engage in the cultivation of curriculum and intentionally find ways to align goals with content
    Consider tracking more than just result goals; track activities and behaviors as well.
  • Reward positive behaviors and minimize negative ones. C-Suite leaders must be overt about this. Share what you see/hear and why you love it. Use key words that match your strategy and align with your goals.
  • Build skill practice into meetings. Just 10 minutes of practice led by a senior leader is enough to reinforce behaviors taught in the classroom.
  • Be an active participant in training
  • Demonstrate to your team the importance of training; if you are willing to prioritize training, your direct reports will do the same.
  • Reduce the intimidation factor by sharing your wisdom and hearing their concerns.

A Center for Practical Management consultant can help guide you in these areas, ensuring that you have the information you need to build sustainable momentum and culture change.

Center for Practical Management helps companies achieve organizational goals and behavioral change initiatives through tailored consulting services, leadership coaching, employee skills training and marketing services. Learn more at www.cf-pm.com.

Center for Practical Management helps companies achieve organizational goals and behavioral change initiatives through tailored consulting services, leadership coaching, employee skills training and marketing services. Learn more at www.cf-pm.com